2016 PTT Annual Report

GOVERNMENT OF SIERRA LEONE
Environment Protection Agency Sierra Leone
Office of the President
21 Old Railway line, Brookfields, Freetown

ANNUAL REPORT OF THE PERFORMANCE TRACKING OF THE ENVIRONMENT PROTECTION AGENCY FOR FISCAL YEAR 2016

Table of Contents
JANUARY – DECEMBER 2016
Foreword

Sierra Leone’s economy and the livelihoods of our people are dependent on the environment such as water, land, air as well as on their associated natural resources, e.g. minerals, plants and animals. These natural resources are increasingly under pressure from unsustainable use, resulting in environmental degradation as well as a decline in ecosystem goods and service. We cannot afford to lose our natural assets, through environmental degradation. Our very survival and that of future generations depends on the sustainable use of our environmental resources. Our challenge, as a country is to utilize natural resources sustainably to the benefit of the country’s economy and the livelihoods of our people. To achieve this objective will require utilization of resources in ways that promote environmental and natural resource conservation, control of all forms of pollution, soil erosion, deforestation, biodiversity loss, general degradation and improved management of national resources.

Our natural assets provide opportunities to achieve economic development and make good progress towards fulfilling the aims and aspirations of the Agenda for Prosperity and the targets of the Millennium Development Goals. Sierra Leone’s socioeconomic transformation cannot be realized without primarily addressing environmental challenges, as sustainable use of our natural resources is indivisibly linked to our development.

Achieving our national sustainable development goals and effectively supporting poverty reduction initiatives will require Sierra Leone to integrate environment and natural resources management principles into the national planning for socio- economic development. Environmental assessment and reporting is therefore a key contribution towards the role of environment in development by providing a reliable information base for environmental management.

Many of our laws are vague, conflicting and outdated and have not had the requisite impact on conservation and protection of the environment. The EPA is determined to reverse this current state of affairs and during the period under review has drafted legislation on hazardous chemical, registration and EIA regulations to give teeth to the EPA act of 2008, as amended in 2010. Additionally, as a critical first step for the integration of environment into the MDA’s, the EPA has compiled seven sector specific environmental guidelines. The guidelines are designed to ensure that environment issues are considered by the sectors in their planning and management, with specific measureable targets.

Challenges of climate change and trans-boundary environmental pollution has been made more complex by population growth and rising public expectations. To deal with these new challenges, EPA-SL must remain financially autonomous to remain relevant, responsive and a resilient organization, leveraging on technology by enhancing our GIS capacity and capabilities, building staff capacity to realize their full potential and ensuring a conducive work environment to facilitate the work has been a top priority for the Environment Protection Agency.

The Environmental Protection Agency acknowledges the growing environmental challenges and has put in place measures to safeguard our environment while realizing economic growth. These measures include the adoption of a revised National Environmental Policy, National Environment Action Plan, and EPA Strategic plan, followed by the gazetting of environment standards determining the modalities of protection, conservation and promotion of environment. All these efforts are focused on overall support for sustainable national development.

The development of environmental regulations on sand mining, tourism, agriculture and manufacturing sectors and the revision of the Environment Protection Agency Act,2008 were characterized by a highly participatory approach from the selection of the themes through drafting of the regulations and validation of the final product. The broad representation at various levels included participants at the District, and Regions and levels of government, development partners and nongovernmental stakeholders, all of whom were intended to guarantee ownership of the reports and legislation by key national stakeholders.

To provide an enhanced service delivery the EPA commissioned a public perception survey to be conducted in order to gauge the public perception of the agency and to provide a baseline for improvement. The EPA continued its outreach, education and sensitization programmes.

During the period under review the EPA embarked on its first
‘Me and My Environment and village to village campaign” which increase knowledge and awareness on environmental issues and climate change of local communities in Sierra Leone. The report was adequately informed by national policies and strategies and will in turn support national environmental governance to the benefit of improved environmental management and envisaged contribution to national social and economic growth and overall human wellbeing.

I am very pleased to present to you the narrative of the activities undertaken and achievements by the EPA, in 2016, in line with the performance tracking table.

While the man on the street may not yet be fully versed with the role and mandate of the EPA, we are determined to change this, the government of Sierra Leone has demonstrated its commitment to preserve and protect our natural ecosystems and the EPA in turn reaffirms its commitment to make the EPA a world-class institution.

I would also like to commend the EPA team, experts, and our sister MDA’S whose dedication and contribution facilitated the work of the EPA. Unity is strength. When there is teamwork and collaboration, wonderful things can happen. We must continue to collaborate so that together we can transform Sierra Leone for the better.

Mrs. Haddijatou Jallow
Executive Chairperson

ACRONYMS/ABBREVIATIONS

AMCEN – African Ministerial Conference on the Environment
AfP -Agenda for Prosperity
CBOs – Community Based Organizations
EIA – Environmental Impact Assessment
EPA-SL – Environment Protection Agency- Sierra Leone
GC/GMEF – UNEP Governing Council/ Global Ministerial Environment Forum
HCFCs – Hydrochlorofluorocarbons
HPMP – Hydrochlorofluorocarbons Phase-out Management Plan
MEAs – Multilateral Environment Agreements
MDAs – Ministries, Departments and Agencies
NAP – National Adaptation Plan
NEP- National Environnemental Policy
NEAP – National Environmental Action Plan
NGOs – Non-Governmental Organizations
ODS – Ozone Depleting Substances
PWD- Public Works Department
RETA – Refrigeration Engineers and Technicians Association
SEA – Strategic Environmental Assessment
SLRTA- Sierra Leone Road Transport Authority
TPMP – Terminal Phase-out Management Plan
UNDP – United Nations Development Programme
UNCED – United Nations Conference on Environment and Development
UNIDO – United Nations Industrial Development Organization
UNEP – United Nations Environment Programme
WAAPP – West African Agricultural Productivity Programme

TABLE OF CONTENTS
Chapter One

1.0 Introduction
2.0 1.2 Brief Description

Chapter Two

Results Achieved as Against Planned Activities for 2016 PTT Implementation
2.1 Results/Outcomes

2.2 OUTCOME ONE: Policy Support, Formulation and Dissemination

Output 1.1: EPA-SL Act of 2008 amended

Output 1.2: Environmental Regulations on Sand mining, Tourism and Manufacturing
sectors developed

Output 1.3: Environment Protection Agency Sierra Leone Service Charter widely popularized

Output 1.4: Certification scheme on refrigerant and air condition technicians established

Output 1.5: Environmental awareness and EPA visibility among the general public enhanced through international environment days celebration

2.3 OUTCOME TWO: Effective Contribution to the Implementation of the Agenda for Prosperity

Output 2.1: Environmental Management Information Systems (EMIS) for Natural Resources in Sierra Leone Developed

Output 2.2: Strategic Environmental Assessment (SEA) of Artisanal mining Sector of Sierra Leone Conducted

Output 2.3: Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) Spatial Database management system established

Output 2.4: Community Based Natural Resources Governance Strengthened through Building Capacity of 4 Local councils in forest edge and Pastoral Communities

Output 2.5: Environmental spatial data collection plan implemented and a Web GIS portal established

Output 2.6: National Ozone protection programmes enhanced through effective collaboration and coordination

Output 2.7: Eight (8) schools trained and supported with sustainable waste management practices
Output 2.8: Intended Nationally Determined Contributions for Sierra Leone effectively reviewed and Roadmap for implementation developed

Output 2.9: Climate Change demonstration initiative strengthened through effective monitoring of 6 existing projects and enhanced the implementation of nine new projects

Output 2.10: Mined out rehabilitation plan for five large scale mining companies implemented

2.4 OUTCOME THREE: Improved Institutional Reforms and Functions

Output 3.1: National Baseline information report on contaminated sites available

Output 3.2: Assessment report on Environmental Load of waste waters/effluents from six manufacturing companies in Freetown available

Output 3.3: National Climate Change Strategy and Action Plan (NCCS&AP) Response Programme implemented

Output 3.4: Costs imposed by the Sierra Leone floods of September 2015 in Freetown Assessed and Quantified

Output 3.5: Economic Implications of Environmental Degradation assessed

Output 3.6 Compendium of Environmental Research Projects for Sierra Leone undertaken from 2005 – 2015 compiled

2.5 OUTCOME FOUR: Improved Capacity of the Environment Protection Agency Sierra Leone

Output 4.1: 32 Technical and Administrative staff trained in various environmental disciplines

Output 4.2: 4 Short term contract, 2 consultants and 9 staff recruited to enhance the daily operations of the Agency

Output 4.3: The accreditation support process through capacity building enhanced

Output 4.4: EPA -SL 85 staff welfare improved

Output 4.5: 30 media practioners and 40 Teacher coordinators trained for effective communication on environmental management

Output 4.6: 25 EPA Technical staff, 5 staff of the law officer’s department,10 members of the Sierra Leone Bar Association, 4 staff of the Environmental Crimes Division, 19 environmental officers of the Local Councils, 5 CSO members, 5 NGO members and 5 media practitioners trained on the guidelines on Environmental Compliance, Enforcement and Prosecution

Output 4.7: 30 Parliamentarians, twelve (12) Civil Society Organization (CSOs) members and Two (2) Legal practitioners and 30 University students trained on Multilateral Environmental Agreements (MEAs) and environmental management

Output 4.8: 110 police officers trained on environmental laws, investigation and prosecution

Output 4.9: 122 registered companies sensitized on the EPA Act of 2008 and its Regulations

Output 4.10: 4 televisions and 16 radio discussions held on the EPA Act of 2008 and its Regulations for continued public awareness

Output 4.11: 20 EPA Technical staff capacities on the Geographic Information Systems (GIS) enhanced

2.6 OUTCOME FIVE: Cross cutting issues through better Coordination, collaboration, corporate Governance and environmental integration promoted

Output 5.1: Ozone Depleting Substances (ODS) regulations enforced and fifteen import/export licences for the control of ODS issued. Database of all importers of Hydrochloroflorocarbons (HCFCs) available.

Output 5.2: Ozone friendly practices initiated by six companies in compliance with the 2010 national ODS regulations

Output 5.3: Collaboration and cooperation with 8 women groups on Climate Smart Agriculture, and other environmental issues enhanced

Output 5.4: Three (3) Community reforestation projects established in three (3) local council areas.

Output 5.5: Capacity building on accessing GEF fund for the private sector enhanced through identifying Investment priorities under the Global Environment Facility (GEF) for the private sector

Output 5.6: Knowledge of 2000 community people in 4 chiefdoms headquarter Towns on environmental issues increased by 50%

Output 5.7: Climate change education and public awareness programme improved countrywide by 50 percent

2.7 OUTCOME SIX: Improved Strategic Innovations and Service Delivery

Output 6.1: Environmental Performance Rating and Disclosure System implemented in Sierra Leone

Output 6.2: Country work programme and projects for Green Climate Fund (GCF) developed

Output 6.3: Annual Report on Environmental Compliance and Enforcement for 102 companies developed

2.8 OUTCOME SEVEN: Improved Institutional Mandate of the Agency

Output 7.1: 40 Environmental Social and Health Impact Assessment (ESHIA) reports/Environmental Management Plans (EMPs) received and reviewed by end of 2016

Output 7.2: 150 EIA licensed projects inspected, monitored and audited for environmental compliance and monitoring reports available. 150 Reports written & Recommendations compiled

Output 7.3: 20 new companies acquired EIA Licences in compliance with the EPA Act 2008 as amended in 2010

Output 7.4: Atlas of 20 ecologically sensitive sites produced

Output 7.5: Environmental awareness rising improved in 40 educational institutions (15 primary, 20 secondary and 5 tertiary institutions)

2.9 OUTCOME EIGHT: Effective use of donor funds

Output 8.1: Effective utilization of Global Environment Facility (GEF) resources enhanced through the alignment of development programmes with the Agenda for Prosperity.

Output 8.2: Climate Change National circumstances and Biennial Update Report project developed and institutional arrangement established.

Output 8.3: Climate Change Mitigation actions and their effects, including associated methodologies and assumptions project developed and implemented.

Output 8.4: Domestic Measurement Reporting and Verification (MRV) on Emission Reduction Project developed and enhanced implementation

CHAPTER ONE
1.0 INTRODUCTION

1.1 Brief Description
Sierra Leone was known to be endowed with natural riches such as mineral resources and biodiversity. The natural vegetation includes lowland moist and semi-deciduous forests, which constitute the westernmost extent of West Africa’s Upper Guinea ecosystem, as well as inland valley swamps, bolilands and wooded savannah. Ten major rivers form the drainage systems, flowing southwest and roughly parallel, from the northern uplands to the extensive mangrove swamps along the coast. The wildlife is typical of the Upper Guinea ecosystem with a few locally endemic species, but with numerous species that find their westernmost range in Sierra Leone.

However, our recent past and current usage of these resources have not contributed meaningfully to economic growth and national development. The wanton destruction and degradation of old growth forests, emissions of pollution and waste, the depletion and pollution of water resources, the decimation of fisheries, and the despoliation of land in order to extract mineral resources have all contributed to the current dismal state of the environment. In addition to the localized negative impact on livelihoods, human well-being and human security, the environmentally unsustainable exploitation of natural resources also have significant trans-boundary impacts that may pose threats to regional peace and stability. Climate Change threat which is as a result of human interference has caused serious loses in terms of life and property which posses negative influence on our economy.

In view of the above, the Environment Protection Agency Sierra Leone was established by an Act of Parliament and has been implementing programmes pursuant to its mandate to protect and manage the environment of Sierra Leone and to contribute towards the implementation of the Agenda for Prosperity which will provide the fundamentals for the country achievement of its sustainable development goals. The Agency signed yearly contract with His Excellency Dr Ernest Bai Koroma to enable assessment and expedite performance.

The Agency for the period under review undertook the activities as recorded in its Performance Tracking Table for 2016. This report outlines the Agency’s approach to environmental management, through the implementation of activities undertaken and achievements made during the first, second, third and fourth quarters of 2016. Coupled with the economic challenge globally in terms of environmental degradation and poverty reduction, the Agency safely indicate that it completed over 95% of all agreed tasks with the government of Sierra Leone on the Performance Tracking Table of planned activities for 2016.

CHAPTER TWO
RESULT ACHIEVED AS AGAINST PLANNED ACTIVITIES FOR 2016 PTT IMPLEMENTATION.
2.1 Results/Outcomes
The Agency, during the twelve months period under review, implemented the following activities in line with its mandate of ensuring the effective protection and management of the environment and its natural resources in order to achieve environmentally sound and sustainable development. The Agency’s planned activities were aligned with the Agenda for Prosperity (A4P), sustainable development goals (SDGs), country policy and institutional assessment (CPIA) and other international benchmarks as provided as part of the annexes of this report.

In the 2016 PTT, the Agency planned eight performance tracking outcomes with fifty-two outputs to be achieved at the end 2016 implementation year. This report captures progress of implementation of activities scheduled for the period January to December 2016.

2.2 Outcome one: Policy Support, Formulation and Dissemination
The following results were achieved under the broad outcome of policy support, formulation and dissemination.

2.2.1 Output 1.1: EPA-SL Act of 2008 amended
The existing EPA Act of 2008 was amended in 2010. However, the amendment was confined to administrative issues. Environmental issues are evolving and dynamic and the 2008 EPA Act, lacks the requisite provisions to address emerging environmental challenges such as climate change, fees for violation and litigation, right to litigate, gender and natural resources management issues. Thus, there is an urgent need to amend the existing EPA Act.

In line with the Agency’s broad mandate to ensure the enactment of an environmental legislation that would address emerging environmental challenges a consultant was hired and series of stakeholder consultations were held in different part of the country. First draft of reviewed Act has been submitted to the agency and the Agency has contracted the services of an external expert to further review the Act. The external expert review comments will be validated by relevant stakeholders and submitted for adaptation by the board of the Agency to ensure the conduct of the pre-legislative workshop for members of parliament as proposed for early next year.

2.2.2 Output 1.2: Environmental Regulations on Sand mining, Tourism and Manufacturing sectors developed
A Legal draftsman was retained early 2016 that conducted broad consultations with key stakeholders and developed drafted regulations on sand mining, tourism, communication, agriculture and manufacturing.

The Agency is planning to ensure that the draft bills developed are validated for onward adoption and enactment by parliament. This will ensure sustainable environmental practices that will enhance the achievement of the sustainable development goals geared towards combating the impact of climate change, support life under water, ensure economic diversification and provide sustained labour.

These regulations will also contribute to the achievement of pillars: 1, 2, 4 and 5 in the Agenda for Prosperity; through sustained sand mining, tourism and manufacturing activities. Sustainable extraction of sand will attract both national and international investors in the tourism and manufacturing sectors, which will enhance sustainable labour and employment opportunities. In addition, the Country Policy Institutional Assessment (CPIA) will be enhanced through the enactment and implementation of these regulations by strengthening policies and institutional capacities for environmental sustainability.

2.2.3 Output 1.3 Environment Protection Agency Sierra Leone Service Charter widely popularized
The Government of Sierra Leone recognizes the far-reaching benefits of using Service Delivery Charters as tools to drive change towards a more customer focused approach throughout the public sector. In conformity with this, the Environment Protection Agency reviewed the first Service Charter with the view of making it more reader friendly and concise for the benefit of all the stakeholders.

In a bid to sensitize the public about the services offered and in compliance with the National Anti-Corruption Strategy, the Agency has made public its service charter in giant bill boards erected at specific locations such as vantage points at the back of Youyi Building; the exit point of the Freetown International Airport, Lungi and the EPA-SL Headquarter Office, 21 Old Railway Line, Freetown etc. Furthermore, the EPA distributed 1000 calendars to institutions as well as individuals nationwide; all calendars circulated have the service charter displayed at the back. This will enhance public understanding about the EPA-SL.

In its effort to continue to raise awareness on the type and quality of services it offers to the people of Sierra Leone, the Agency has held four televisions and twenty radio discussions nationwide on the service charter informing Sierra Leoneans on:
• Who we are;
• What we are committed to do;
• The accessibility of our services;
• How we can be contacted;
• Our values and standards;
• Rights and responsibilities of the customers;
• Transparent ways of communicating and giving feedback and
• How do we enhance partnership?

This has enabled the public and proponents in particular to know the services provided by the Agency in our collective efforts to promote sound environmental management in contributing towards achieving sustainable development and poverty reduction.
2.2.4 Output 1.4: Certification scheme on refrigerant and air condition technicians established
The Agency conducted assessment on the existing capacity of three different institutions namely, Government Technical Institute (GTI) Kissy, Milton Margai College of Education Science and Technology (MMCET), Congo Cross and Germany Technical Institute (GTZ), Kissy Dockyard to ascertain the readiness levels for certification on refrigerant and air condition technicians in early 2016. After the assessment, the Government Technical Institute (GTI) at Kissy Dockyard was found most suitable and therefore the Agency went into a memorandum of Understanding (MOU) towards the effective implementation of the Certification Scheme for Refrigeration Engineers and Technicians in Sierra Leone.

With this MOU, sixty-eight (68) trained and certified on refrigeration and air conditioning techniques and they are drawn from mining, manufacturing and other private technicians to practice in Sierra Leone as stipulated in the Ozone Depleting Substances (ODS) regulation 2010. The ultimate goal of this training was to build their capacity on good refrigeration practices and ensure control measures for the protection of the ozone layer and averting the impact of climate change, which address the strategic development goal 13.

Fig: 1 Participants on the training for Refrigeration and Air Conditioning Technicians

2.2.5 Output 1.5: Environmental awareness and EPA visibility among the general public enhanced through international environment days celebration
The Agency acknowledges the fact that educating public can be one of the most powerful tools in the battle against threats of the environment. With this in mind the Agency seizes the opportunity to engage in different initiatives in rising awareness regularly. In 2016, the Agency celebrated special day’s such as African Environment Day, World Environment Day, World Ozone Day and International Day of Climate Action through galvanizing the school nature club students to disseminate environmental messages and promote sustainable development principles through the media, sensitizing communities and radio discussions.

The Agency also collaboration with relevant MDAs and civil society organizations (CSO’s) and other stakeholders in the commemoration of the special environmental day’s highlighted above to further increase knowledge and awareness raising in the need to protect and manage our environment for human health and wellbeing.

Fig 2: Participants from different School Nature Clubs on the World Environment Day Celebration.

2.3 Outcome Two: Effective Contribution to the Implementation of the Agenda for Prosperity
The following results were achieved under the broad outcome of Effective Contribution to the Implementation of the Agenda for Prosperity.

2.3.1 Output 2.1: Environmental Management Information Systems (EMIS) for Natural Resources in Sierra Leone Developed
The EPA-SL in fulfilling the overall role in the natural resources sector is overseeing the implementation of natural resource management under the Pillar 2 of Agenda for Prosperity. It is therefore common place for international investors, researchers, corporate organizations, inquiries and requests for data from the EPA-SL. The Agency lacks comprehensive information on Natural resources, and often a time it has been challenged in its enforcement drive. Taking into consideration the number of development projects embarked upon in the country, it is essential to establish baseline database management information systems of natural resources. This is critically important in order to provide empirical evidence of the state of natural resources and guidance in preventing over-exploitation and would serve as a tool to determine the extent the region that has already been desecrated.

In 2016, an EMIS database template and detailed baseline maps were produced. Database Management Information Systems (DBMIS) for Natural Resources in Sierra Leone was also developed and effectively functional, following a comprehensive data collection plan which includes a comprehensive system, designed on Spatial Data Management Information System EMIS database template and detailed baseline maps for Natural Resources in Sierra Leone available.

Fig 3: Natural Resources Spatial Data for Sierra Leone

2.3.2 Output 2.2: Strategic Environmental Assessment (SEA) of Artisanal mining Sector of Sierra Leone Conducted
The environmental degradation caused by artisanal mining is a major problem in Sierra Leone with little or no efforts being made to rehabilitate the land which is left exposed and degraded and unsuitable for farming and other activities, after it has been abandoned by the miners. Artisanal mining activities often lead to diversion of surface drainage systems and cause serious siltation in rivers, making the water unfit for use by downstream users.

In 2016, the Agency embarked on Strategic Environmental Assessment (SEA) of the Artisanal mining sector in a bid to transform the sector into a more viable and sustainable one that contributes to growth and development. A consultant hired, field surveys conducted and scoping report produced. National validation workshop was held on 24th November, 2016.

These are the findings & recommendation
 Artisanal mining license have been granted, but mine land rehabilitation has not been enforced by NMA, and the local authorities are not seen to be playing major role in this.
 Some of the actual artisanal miners were found to be operating without NMA license and these are grouped in less than 10 workers.
 License holders are normally Sierra Leoneans, but the mining plots are being worked by either Sierra Leoneans or other citizens, like the Chinese.
 Much of the mining operations are organized in such a system where laborers receive a daily wage and are not considered for a share after the mining operations.
 Many independent miners lack capital, so are wholly dependent on supports from financiers. There are often a tripartite agreement between miners, land owners/license holders and the mine supporters.
 Many miners are reluctant to rehabilitate the mined land, on the notion that rehabilitation fees are paid to governments which relieves them of rehabilitation responsibilities.
2.3.3 Output 2.3: Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) Spatial Database management system established
The Environmental impacts of mining are of greater interest today than ever before, there is a call to diversify our economy, laying greater emphasis on agriculture, fisheries and tourism. In so doing, we need to manage and minimize environmental impacts that may affect communities and the natural habitat near mining operations, including land cover change, waste rock and tailing disposal, dust and noise, water use and re-use, and pollution. Setting up an Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) Spatial Database management system can play an important role in informing this process by providing valuable information about mining operations to regulators, industry, affected communities and the general population.

In early 2016, the process was initiated and now the Agency can boast of a comprehensive concession database developed with an established system designed on Environmental Impact Assessment project concession areas in Sierra Leone. The EIA project concession area database is updated regularly as the number of the EIA application increases.

2.3.4 Output 2.4: Community Based Natural Resources Governance Strengthened through Building Capacity of 4 Local councils in forest edge and Pastoral Communities
Sierra Leone’s development blue print, the Agenda for Prosperity (AfP) that the nation will be becoming a middle-income country by 2035. The development blue print aims at ensuring that achieving socio-economic status would be an all-encompassing green sustainable and principles. As the majority of the Sierra Leone population depends on natural resource based livelihood drive, the EPA recognizes that sustainable utilization and management of natural resources is fundamental to achieving sustainable development in Sierra Leone.

The Agency acknowledges that deforestation and land degradation are interlinked threats to the livelihood of most people in Sierra Leone and that addressing these threats requires improved governance at nation and local levels. In 2016, the Agency identified stakeholders of local council and community authorities trained in natural resources management through a project approach, in five (5) districts of (Bo and Moyamba in the South, Kenema in the East and Bombali and Tonkolili in the North). Four (4) communities Natural Resource Management (NRM) plans developed and implemented.

Fig 4: A female participant making contribution during training sessions in Bo

2.3.5 Output 2.5: Environmental spatial data collection plan implemented and a Web GIS portal established
The Agency lacks comprehensive spatial database and often a time it has been challenged in its enforcement drive. The establishment of environmental spatial data collection plan and a web geographic information system (GIS) portal will provide a robust and high quality geographic information system that enables effective planning and accurate decision making. Sound environmental management of data processing activities can avoid high remediation costs, thereby preserving public and private funds.

An Information Technology Consultant was hired early 2016 to work with the Web GIS expert and the GIS server has been installed and configured. The database plan was implemented and Data inputted into the Management Information Systems (MIS) database template, which is hosted in the web base GIS portal of the Agency commenced. The web base portal has been developed and deployed into the server.

Fig 5: Web base GIS Portal Interface
2.3.6 Output 2.6: National Ozone protection programmes enhanced through effective collaboration and coordination
With increasing international attention on ozone protection, climate change and global warming, national governments of every country have galvanized plans to mitigate their effects by putting in place plans, programmes and structures to thwart the adverse impacts.

In 2016, As part of its mandate and in addressing one key objective of the Institutional Strengthening Project of the Montreal Protocol, the National Ozone Unit of EPA engaged Refrigeration ,Engineers , Technicians Association (RETA) at their Offices in Freetown, Bo , Makeni and Kono to discuss the national regulations on ozone depleting substances and the importance role of the technicians and issues of licensing for the technicians as per the 2010 ODS regulations were discussed to enhance the implementation of the regulation.

Fig 6 Participants at the RETA meeting in Makeni

2.3.7 Output 2.7: Eight (8) schools trained and supported with sustainable waste management practices

In 2015, Environment Protection Agency Sierra Leone (EPA-SL) implemented a pilot project on sustainable solid waste management for Secondary Schools across the country. Eight (8) schools benefitted from this project as five (5) dustbins supplied to each and the EPA-SL trained Nature Clubs Teacher Coordinators, Janitors and students on separation, recycling, reuse and composting of solid waste.

In early 2016, a needs assessment checklist was developed and administered to ascertain which of the other schools with Nature Clubs not yet benefited need to be supported.
Western Urban and Rural districts are prioritized as they faced serious challenges in terms of solid waste management. At the end of the quarter a total of four schools supported with Twenty (25) giant dustbins and eight (8) government institutions supported also with twenty five (25) giant dustbins.

Table 1: Four schools selected for solid waste management projects

No. Name of School Location of School
1 Kelly’s Rural Vocational and Agricultural Secondary School Hastings
2 Services Secondary School Juba Hill
3 Kulafai Rashideen Islamic Secondary School Tokeh
4 Albert Academy Berry Street

(1) The Environment Protection Agency Sierra Leone
(2) Sierra Leone Police (CID- Environment Crime Unit)
(3) Ministry of Works, Housing and Infrastructure
(4) Ministry of Finance, Economic and Development
(5) Ministry of Foreign Affairs and International Cooperation
(6) Sierra Leone Broadcasting Corporation
(7) National Revenue Authority (Customs Department)
(8) House of Parliament

2.3.8 Output 2.8: Intended Nationally Determined Contributions for Sierra Leone effectively reviewed and Roadmap for implementation developed
Sierra Leone is categorized as one of the countries that are highly vulnerable to the adverse impact effect of climate change and therefore if urgent action is not taken there is tendency for greater destruction and suffering for the citizens of the nation. In a bid to reduce the country’s vulnerability to climate change impact and in adherence to Sustainable Development Goal 13, Sierra Leone through the Environment Protection Agency – Sierra Leone (EPA-SL) seek support from the European Union through United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) to developed the Country Intended Nationally Determined Contribution and submitted on the 1st October 2015 to the Secretariat of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC).

In 2016, the Agency engaged stakeholders in Freetown and the provinces including cabinet and parliamentarians to review the document for the development of a framework for the implementation of the INDC’s. Cabinet approved the document together with the Paris Agreement which was later ratified on the 1st November 2016 by Parliament. Framework for the implementation of the nationally determined contributions (NDC) of Sierra Leone as a country framework to support low emission pathways and build a climate resilient nation with a clear resource mobilization framework to support climate action of the sustainable development goal 13 is available.

Fig 7: High table officials during the INDC Workshop in Parliament

2.3.9 Output 2.9: Climate Change demonstration initiative strengthened through effective monitoring of 6 existing projects and enhanced the implementation of nine new projects
The Environment Protection Agency, Sierra Leone (EPA-SL) approved Climate Change Adaptation project proposals on merit basis for school nature clubs since 2015. Implementation of these said projects commences on receipt of funds from the Agency. These projects are designed to address climate change challenges across schools in the country.

In 2015, six schools identified proposal were approved and supported to undertake climate change demonstration projects. In order to assess the implementation of these projects, in quarter one of 2016, the Climate Change Secretariat of the Environment Protection Agency Sierra Leone a detailed field assessment of the six (6) old projects conducted and report available. While within the period of 2016 (9) School nature clubs demonstration projects submitted and implementation monitored. Overall assessment conducted and report available.

Fig 8: Holy Trinity Secondary School Reforestation Project site.

2.3.10 Output 2.10: Mined out rehabilitation plan for five large scale mining companies implemented
With the mandate to coordinate the effective management of environmental matters and ensure sustainable utilization of the country’s natural resources as provided for in the Agenda for Prosperity Pillar 2, EPA-SL in 2015 hired the services of a consultant to investigate the issues facing mined out rehabilitation and to determine what actions could be taken to address these challenges. Five major companies were assessed including the Sierra Rutile Limited, Timis Mining Corporation, Octea Kimberlite Mining project, Sierra Mineral Holdings Limited and the African Minerals Limited.

In 2016 to follow-up with the 2015 assessment, the EPA-SL developed an engagement plan aimed at bringing together regulators of the mineral sector to discuss the recommendations of this assessment and map a way-forward. Consultations held with the five identified companies to develop a plan. After several meetings implementation modalities were agreed upon and monitoring commences. The results of the follow-up monitoring indicated that all the companies are still facing challenges in implementing that would yield excellent mine rehabilitation outcomes.

2.4 Outcome Three: Improved Institutional Reforms and Functions The following results were achieved under the broad outcome of Improved Institutional Reforms and Functions

2.4.1 Output 3.1: National Baseline information report on contaminated sites available
Contaminated land can have major economic, legal and planning implications for the environment. Contamination may limit land use potential or increase costs for developers and government. Some sites are located near water bodies, hospitals, schools, markets and many more public places which increase the risk levels to the health and environment of our citizenry. Their investigation and clean-up is important to protect human health and the environment.

The Agency undertook a yearly initial assessment of contaminated sites nationwide in 2016, in other to have basic information on issues that could affect the health and wellbeing of the environment. A consultant was hired; desk review and data collected conducted by Mr. Melville Henry Richards, Data analysed and report which was validated and approved.

Fig 9: Contaminated Site in Makeni

2.4.2 Output 3.2: Assessment report on Environmental Load of waste waters/effluents from six manufacturing companies in Freetown available
Environmental Load of Waste waters/Effluents can be a major problem in Sierra Leone especially urban centers if they are not monitored. The Environment Protection Agency Sierra Leone is mandated to prescribe standards and guidelines relating to waste water/effluent.

Major sources of water pollution in Freetown in particular are due to waste effluent from industrial and other human activities. These pollutants are known to have negative human effects if they are in high concentrations e.g. metals, in organics, organics and other quality indicators of health risk.

In 2016, the Agency hired the services of a consultant and consultant undertake desk review and field data collection which was alter analysed to produced the draft report. The study exercise considered all effluent quality aspects (physical, chemical and biological) and their effects in the Freetown environment and also company policies, and activities for the collection, analysis, assessment, archiving, distribution, reporting, and use of related information on effluent management. Six (6) pilot companies selected Kings Production (SL) Limited, Kadco (SL) Limited, Sierra Leone Brewery Limited, Sierra Leone Bottling Company Limited, Victory Enterprise and Rainbow Paints and Chemicals (SL) Limited. These companies have environmental impact assessment licences to operate within communities with wastewater management as part of the agreed terms and conditions and Assessment report available.

2.4.3 Output 3.3: National Climate Change Strategy and Action Plan (NCCS&AP) Response Programme implemented
The Climate Change Secretariat has identified Ministries, Departments and Agencies to collaborate with in the implementation of the National Climate Change Strategic and Action Plan Response Programme.

Early 2016, key sectors such as water, energy, tourism, fisheries and marine resources priority response programme within the National Climate Change Strategy and Action Plan has been identified and possible funding opportunities such as the Global Environment Facility (GEF), Green Climate Fund (GCF) and Global Climate Change Alliance (GCCA) has also been identified for proposal submission and funding. Further endorsement provided under the GEF for both Star and Non Star allocation.

a. Submitted a project concept on promoting institutional capacity and legislative framework to support the implementation of the country commitment to the Paris Agreement that are in the form of nationally determined contributions by 2017. The budgeted amount for the proposal is 2.1 million dollars
b. Green Climate Fund (GCF) readiness proposal finalization on the implementing partner fiduciary review.
c. Proposal submitted to the Nairobi Work Programme for funding that includes climate change priorities.
d. Climate Technology Centre Network (CTCN) technical proposal submitted in August 2016 that will capacitate the country to better capacity building programmers within institutions.
e. Adapting to climate change induced coastal risks management in Sierra Leone. This project will be jointly implemented by EPA and UNDP in collaboration with relevant MDAs and CSOs.
f. Regional Proposal on the “Management of Persistent Organic Pollutants (POPs) pesticides and related waste in West Africa” which is also a priority programme highlighted in the national climate change strategy and action plan.
g. Regional Proposal on the “Capacity strengthening for pest and pesticide management in West Africa” which is also a priority programme highlighted in the NCCS&AP.

2.4.4 Output 3.4: Costs imposed by the Sierra Leone floods of September 2015 in Freetown Assessed and Quantified
The EPA-SL allocated funds for the conduct of an assessment of the costs incurred because of the flooding in September, 2015. In order to strengthen understanding of the economic dimension of this kind of environmental harm, the Agency retained the services of the selected international consultant in mid 2017, the Landcare Research New Zealand Limited and three local consulting firms to quantify the actual costs that arose from these floods.

The consultants undertook a diagnostic analysis on previous report and desk reviews, and administered detail questionnaire to the communities affected by the flash flood. The consultants also undertook a comparative analysis on the extent of impact within the affected communities in Freetown and in the provinces. Consultants to send in draft report within two weeks with quantification of the cost of the flooding to the country, to guide government in putting mechanism in place to effectively monitor the trend of things within the affected environment and it will be used as a baseline for loss and damage under the Paris Agreement. This would support any future claim by Government’s for compensation under the ambit of loss and damage.

The report will provides recommendations to the government in finding solution to address the impacts of climate change in the country that in turn will have a positive feedback on supporting the achievement of SDGS 9 and 13, pillar 2 of the Agenda for prosperity and the CPIA.
2.4.5 Output 3.5: Economic Implications of Environmental Degradation assessed
In a bid to strengthen the environmental performance of our country in relation to the cost implication of degrading the environment and in pursuit to contributing to the achievement of Sustainable Development Goals, the Agency assessed the economic implication of environmental degradation for different sectors including agriculture, mining, health, waste management and transport.

In 2016, the agency hired a consultant to analysis, assessing and measuring the costs of environmental degradation to the economy of Sierra Leone. Understanding the inter-linkages and financial benefits is vital as part of the Agenda for Prosperity for good environmental governance. Therefore, the retained consultant prepared a framework and report that indicate clear recommendations to EPA-SL and formulated conclusions on the feasibility of the implementation of the framework for sustainable financial mechanism for EPA-SL and assessing the cost of environmental degradation to the economy of Sierra Leone. The consultant also indicated clear policy implications for the EPA-SL based on the findings. Economic implications of Environmental Degradation Assessment report available.

2.4.6 Output 3.6 Compendium of Environmental Research Projects for Sierra Leone undertaken from 2005 – 2015 compiled
In 2016, the Agency recognized the need to develop a comprehensive document on all environmental research/projects conducted within Sierra Leone commencing 2005 to 2015, which will serve as reference document on useful information for all researches to be carried out by eminent researchers and could be used to address issues identified in the studies for future environment interventions.

In light of the above, nine (9) academic institutions, twenty (21) Ministries, Department and Agencies (MDAs) and eleven (11) Non-governmental organizations (NGOs) were identified. Draft reporting format for all environmental researches was developed and meetings organized, information collected and analyze by institution.

Through this method the Agency has facilitated putting together many environmental related researches undertaken in many national institutions and developed a compendium of environmental research projects in Sierra Leone.

2.5 Outcome Four: Improved Capacity of the Environment Protection Agency Sierra Leone
The following results were achieved under the broad outcome of Improved Capacity of the Environment Protection Agency Sierra Leone.

2.5.1 Output 4.1: 32 Technical and Administrative staff trained in various environmental disciplines
The Agency in other to enhance the capacity of members of staff, opportunity provided for both national and international training in various fields relating to environmental and natural resources management, compliance and enforcement, administration and financial services, procurement and climate change during different quarter of the year 2016.
• Twenty-two (22) technical members of staff locally trained on Environmental & Climate Change Modules.
• Fifteen (15) Administrative/Finance staff trained in Justified Procurement and Inventory management.
• Three (3) members of staff benefitted from international trainings on Environmental Impact Assessment for Water related policies and development; E-Learning exercise on Biodiversity on Protected Area Management; Environmental Assessment, Integrated Water Resources Management and Food security.
• Thirteen (13) technical members of staff trained locally on Geographic Information System (GIS) applications on GIS Database template for reviews, environmental monitoring, appraisal and policy making, development of program data and improved database into a spatial environment for program data analysis.
• Three (3) IEC staff trained on video production, photographing and editing of filming and documentaries.
• Two (2) members of staff benefitted from international trainings on Sustainable Investment in the Agricultural Sector and Integrated Water resource Management as a tool to Climate Change Adaptation.
• 13 technical members of staff trained on Calculation of Environment Impact Assessment License Fees.
• Three (3) members of staff trained on Physiochemical Analysis.
• Three (3) members of staff trained on website management.
• Four (4) members of staff benefitted from international trainings on environmental management and development, environmental monitoring and Equipment for developing countries and in Climate Change for Officials.
• Four (4) members of staff trained locally on Laboratory management and Physiochemical Analysis.
• Two (2) technical staff trained locally on Safeguarding Land Tenure Rights in Agricultural Investment and
• Ten (10) Technical members of staff trained locally on Geographic Information System (GIS) data collection and analysis using Global Positioning System (GPS) Trimble technology.

2.5.2 Output 4.2: 4 Short term contract, 2 consultants and 9 staff recruited to enhance the daily operations of the Agency
The EPA-SL continues to grow and in order to meet the challenges of environmental management filled the following positions in 2016: Director of the Agency, Deputy Director of Planning, Policy and Research, Assistant Deputy Director of Natural Resource Management, Assistant Deputy Director of Finance, Public Relations Officer, Assistant Deputy Director Chemicals and Pollution Control, Assistant Head of Procurement, Logistics Officer, Assistant Head of Information Technology and GIS technician, Administrative Assistant.

Four short term contracts signed for the positions of Senior Legal Officer, Librarian/Records Clerk, Assistant Head, Information and Technology and Monitoring and Evaluation Consultant. Three consultants were also hired to undertake a Customer Service and Employee satisfaction survey; Monitoring and Evaluation of the Governance and Justice Sector and a Strategic Environmental assessment of Artisanal Mining in Sierra Leone.
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Recruitment is in progress for Legal and Compliance Officer, Assistant Deputy Director Planning, Policy and Research, Legal Assistant and Administrative Officer

2.5.3 Output 4.3: The accreditation support process through capacity building enhanced
The Climate Change Secretariat of the Environment Protection Agency engaged on robust regional sensitization of the Green Climate Fund (GCF) to build capacities of different stakeholders, MDA’s, CSO’s Private Sector on access modalities and how different categories of institution can be endorsed to assess the Fund. Also accreditation processes workshop held in the regions and one national which draw different set of institutions for possible capacity support for accreditation. Follow ups with the GCF to assess readiness funds which also makes provision to strengthened capacities of institution is ongoing.

Sierra Leone will receive the sum of USD10 million as grant from the Adaptation Fund, a self-standing fund established under the Kyoto Protocol of the UNFCCC, to develop and implement climate change projects and programmes to mitigate impacts of climate change.

Fig10 : Distribution of the Adaptation Fund resources to identied accredited entities

A national stakeholder dialogue on Green Climate Fund (GCF) accreditation processes was conducted in June, 2016 and distributed 300 flyers with information on GCF accreditation process to stakeholders.
Sierra Leone will receive the sum of USD10 million as grant from the Adaptation Fund, a self-standing fund established under the Kyoto Protocol of the UNFCCC, to develop and implement climate change projects and programmes to mitigate impacts of climate change.

In view of this, the Agency identified potential applicants to serve as national implementing entities and conducted a training workshop on the accreditation process and fiduciary standards, and direct access modalities to access the Adaptation Fund resources without taking the detour of the multilateral entities. The Ministry of Finance and Economic Development has been identified and are now in the process of been accredited through the support of a south- south cooperation with the Ecologique Centre of Senegal

2.5.4 Output 4.4: EPA -SL 85 staff welfare improved
As an ongoing commitment to the welfare of our staff, several interactive sessions organized to increase staff knowledge on critical areas to better capacitate them to meet their commitment as staff of the Agency in terms of performance.

The Human Resource Manual has been approved by the Board of Directors and distributed to members of staff in April; 2016.Training sessions organised in to improve knowledge and understating of the manual. To enable the administrative process, 3 meetings were held quarterly, comprising of senior management of the Agency and discussions were held on policies and monitoring progress of the operations of the Agency. In addition, general staff meetings held to addressed relevant issues, concerns and innovations to improve on the working environment of staff.

In addition several training on gender, sexual harassment, starts a business; Enhancing Business Etiquette, Medical Insurance Scheme, ethics of customer service and Breast Cancer Awareness were conducted in different quarters of 2016 to help improve on staff knowledge on related disciplines. The Agency strongly encourages female staff to be meeting regularly and sharing concerns.

Fig 11: Female Staff in the Female Staff Annual Meeting at the EPA-SL Conference Room.
2.5.5 Output 4.5: 30 media practioners and 40 Teacher coordinators trained for effective communication on environmental management
The print, broadcast, and Internet media can be a powerful ally in educating the public on environmental matters. In order to perform this role effectively, the Environment Protection Agency deemed it necessary to work with the media. In this regard, the Agency conducted training for 30 media practitioners in March 11th 2016 at the Sierra Leone Association of Journalists (SLAJ) head office conference hall, Campbell Street.

Fig.12: Media Practitioners in training

On the 1 & 3rd of September 2016, the IEC Department and Climate Change Secretariat of the EPA-SL conducted a successfully training of teacher coordinators on climate change and environmental management in Makeni and Bo respectively. The training brought together 45 teachers from various secondary schools in the north and southern provinces.

2.5.6 Output 4.6: 25 EPA Technical staff, 5 staff of the law officers department,10 members of the Sierra Leone Bar Association, 4 staff of the Environmental Crimes Division, 19 environmental officers of the Local Councils, 5 CSO members, 5 NGO members and 5 media practitioners trained on the guidelines on Environmental Compliance, Enforcement and Prosecution
In 2015, the Environment Protection Agency developed a guideline on Environmental Compliance, Enforcement and Prosecution. While In 2016, implementation of the guidelines commences, one-day training was organized for legal practitioners of the Law Officers Department and the Sierra Leone Bar Association to ensure that they understand the issues of compliance and enforcement related to environmental protection and management. Similar training conducted for more legal officers and legal practitioners in July 2016.

The Agency further organized training for 19 environmental officers of the Local Councils. The venue for the training was in Bo. Environmental Officers of all the Local Councils except Kono City Council and Freetown City Council were absent. Similarly 5 CSO’s, 5 NGO, 10 media practitioners and 15 legal practitioners drawn from the Law Officers Department and the Sierra Leone Bar Association in conjunction with Sierra Leone Police trained on the guidelines on Environmental Compliance, Enforcement and Prosecution by Project Umubano on the 19th and 20th of September 2016. Project Umubano is the UK Conservative Party’s international social action project.

Fig 13 Participants (CSO’s, Ngo’s and Media Practitioners) in training

2.5.7 Output 4.7: 30 Parliamentarians, Twelve (12) Civil Society Organization (CSOs) members and Two (2) Legal practitioners and 30 University students trained on Multilateral Environmental Agreements (MEAs) and environmental management
The Agency with support from UNEP organized a training workshop for the benefit of 50 Members of Parliament on the 5th November 2016, to strengthen the capacity of Sierra Leone in environmental law through training, sharing of expertise and legal guidance materials through technical assistance and providing legal advisory services to the country.

Fig 14: Members of Parliament, Representative from UNEP,Robert Wabonoha

Similarly, fifty (50) University Students trained on importance of MEAs in protecting the environment and the need to domesticate them through national laws and enforcement. Twelve (12) Civil Society Organizations (CSOs) members and Legal Practitioner participated in international meeting on sub-regional training workshop on three MEA’s namely the Stockholm Convention, Basel Convention, and Rotterdam Convention. Sierra Leone participants include Judge of the High Court of Sierra Leone in the person of Honourable Justice Rahman Mansaray and two legal practitioners (one from the Law Reform Commission, Mr. Aloysious Foday-Kai and another from the Environment Protection Agency, Ms. Ladonnette Macauley).

2.5.8 Output 4.8: 110 police officers trained on environmental laws, investigation and prosecution
In 2016, the Agency organized one-day training for fifty Police Officers in the Southern and Eastern Provinces on Environmental Laws, Investigation and Prosecution of Environmental Crimes on the 26th January, 2016 in Bo city. The training targeted 50 Police Officers from Bo, Bonthe, Moyamba, Pujehun, Kenema and Kailahun. Similarly 20 police officers of the Eastern Province trained on environmental laws, investigation and prosecution during the second quarter of 2016. 42 police officers trained in the Western Area on environmental laws, investigation and prosecution with support from UNEP conducted on the 19th and 20th September 2016.

Fig 15: Police Officers in training on Environmental laws, investigation and prosecution

The above mention training has enhanced the work of the Agency in terms of collaboration to effective enforce although there are still challenges with the availability of security person to facilitate the smooth implementation of certain enforcement activities.
2.5.9 Output 4.9: 122 registered companies sensitized on the EPA Act of 2008 and its Regulations
As part of the Agency drive to improve on compliance in it regulations by proponents deem it fit to organize a sensitization on the EPA Act of 2008 and its regulation.

In 2016, the Agency was able to organised four workshops on the EPA Act of 2008 and its regulations attended by representatives of One Hundred and thirty two (132) companies in the Northern Province (35 Companies), Southern Province (30 Companies), Western Area (37 Companies) and Eastern Province (30 Companies).
2.5.10 Output 4.10: 4 television and 16 radio discussions held on the EPA Act of 2008 and its Regulations for continued public awareness
Television discussions on the EPA Act of 2008 and its regulations were held at the SLBC, AYV and STAR Televisions within the different quarters of 2016 on the EPA Act of 2008 and its regulations and a phone in programme facilitated to encourage strong participation by the listening public. Similarly, radio discussions held in Society for Radio Democracy 98.1, SLBC, Star Radio, for continued public awareness. The radio discussion was recorded and aired in Makeni, Northern Province, Bo, Southern Province and Kenema, Eastern Province in the first and second, third and fourth quarters.

The legal team of the EPA-SL further organised live radio phone in programmes in Makeni, Kono and Bo during the reporting period of 2016.

Fig 16: Legal Team of the EPA-SL and the PRO holding live TV discussions

2.5.11 Output 4.11: 20 EPA Technical staff capacity on the Geographic Information Systems (GIS) enhanced
The collection, measurement and management of the finite information on Sierra Leone’s natural resources, such as on its terrestrial, marine and atmospheric environment is the primary responsibility of EPA-SL. Prior to this training, EPA-SL had developed a robust geo-database to collect, measure, store, analyze and manage information about the environment.

In 2016, the EPA- SL technical staff trained in the area of GPS/GIS technology to respond to the increasing demand by Government, International Community, Institutions, Organizations and the public for ready and accurate information about Sierra Leone’s natural environment. In the first of 2016, twenty (20) EPA-SL technical staff trained in the use of GPS for environmental data collection and processing. In second quarter of 2016, 14 staff trained on the use of Geographic Information Systems application as a tool in Environmental monitoring. In fourth quarter 10 staff trained on the use of Geographic Information Systems application as a tool in data collection and Analysis in Environmental Impact Assessment Studies.

2.6 Outcome Five: Cross cutting issues through better Coordination, collaboration, corporate Governance and environmental integration promoted
The following results were achieved under the broad outcome of Cross cutting issues through better Coordination, collaboration, corporate Governance and environmental integration promoted.

2.6.1 Output 5.1: Ozone Depleting Substances (ODS) regulations enforced and fifteen import/export licences for the control of ODS issued. Database of all importers of Hydroclorofluorocarbons (HCFCs) available
As part of its mandate and being the international environmental focal point, the EPA-SL in the implementation of the Montreal Protocol, sort out the list of importers of ODS from the NRA Customs Department in 2016. Each of these was formally contacted in order to identify the active importers. Based on their responses, the database captured was developed, reviewed and updated for seven companies. They include Vas Skills training Center, Ishwari & Son Enterprises, Samsung World Limited, LG, Mount Aureol Freight Services, Harry’s (SL) Ltd., and Golden Mills Ltd. The database captures the description of each ODS, its HS code, trade and chemical names.

This database is regularly monitored and updated to ensure consistency in the information available and to better plan a clear strategy on how to enforce the ODS regulation. The database is now the baseline use to seek information for effective enforcement of the ODS regulation

2.6.2 Output 5.2: Ozone friendly practices initiated by six companies in compliance with the 2010 national ODS regulations
As a way to complement the Montréal Protocol, Sierra Leone via EPA-SL act of 2008 as amended in 2010 and its regulation of 2010 make clear provisions to support the protocol. However, EPA-SL in its mandate to protect the environment and its citizenry conducted an assessment study on the use of ODS in six selected companies. The purpose of this exercise was to ascertain that best environmental practices to protect the ozone layer and the climate were dully followed. A checklist was also developed for implementations
In early 2016, an initial assessment was done on eleven (11) companies to select six (6) for the final assessment. These six (6) companies were selected based on their mode of operations, technical staffs’, capacity and there potential to use ODS. Among the six (6) companies, there are four (4) companies that deals with refrigerant and cooling systems and Two (2) are foam manufactures. As a follow-up activity, The Agency conducted a survey to assess Ozone friendly practices in two (2) companies in Freetown namely; Sierra Fishing Company Limited and Sabco Fishing Company Limited.
This is in-line with the Montreal Protocol which is one of the most successful environmental agreements to date. Its widespread adoption and implementation are an example of exceptional international co-operation. The Montreal Protocol on Substances that Deplete the Ozone Layer was designed to reduce the production and consumption of ozone depleting substances in order to reduce their abundance in the atmosphere, and thereby protect the earth’s fragile ozone Layer.

2.6.3 Output 5.3: Collaboration and cooperation with 8 women groups on Climate smart Agriculture, and other environmental issues enhanced
Women’s livelihoods are often linked to the environment. Sierra Leone women have traditional responsibilities as food growers, water and fuel gatherers, and care-givers. This means they depend on natural resources in their daily lives and are more likely to be affected by environmental impacts. Involving women in protecting the environment would help societies develop the sense of responsibility needed to maintain a good balance between humans and the earth’s resources.

In order to address climate change related issues and problems in Sierra Leone, the Environment Protection Agency has been working assiduously with eleven women groups who are actively engaged in agricultural activities in the Bombali, Koinadugu, Kono, Bo, Kenema and Kailahun Districts with the aim of increasing their level of knowledge in the protection and management of the environment. In 2016 this women organizations have been supported to implement smart agricultural programmes working closely with the MAFFs technical teams in the districts. The groups were further guided to develop proposal and seek funding, five (5) of the groups have access the GEF small grant programme.

Fig 17: Quie Don DonYa Agricultural Women Group in action at their swamp rice farm, KombaYendeh

2.6.4 Output 5.4: Three (3) Community reforestation projects established in three (3) local council areas.
Forests are disappearing at an unprecedented rated despite their economic and ecological roles including stabilization of carbon dioxide concentration, one of the greenhouse gases. Human activities including shifting cultivation, logging and charcoal production are responsible for the loss of forests. It has been established by scientists that the rate of forest loss is far greater than the rate of forest regeneration.

In order to replace the forest lost, the Environment Protection Agency- Sierra Leone (EPA-SL) in collaboration with District Councils and other stakeholders in 2015 initiated reforestation projects in various parts of the Country to regenerate forests in highly deforested and forest degraded areas, which activity needs to be extended to other chiefdoms. It was on this note officers of the EPA-SL Regional Offices in Bo visited the Moyamba and Bo Districts in Southern Sierra Leone to identify a suitable Chiefdom for implementation of the 2016 proposed reforestation project in the Southern Region. Tools and related inputs provided, guided by training programmes for the successful implementation of the initiatives

2.6.5 Output 5.5: Capacity building on accessing GEF fund for the private sector enhanced through identifying Investment priorities under the Global Environment Facility (GEF) for the private sector
The Global Environment Facility (GEF) National Dialogue Initiative (NDI) is designed to facilitate a series of country level dialogues on GEF related issues and themes. National Dialogues aim to raise awareness about the GEF, strengthen country level coordination and ownership, and clarify and address country GEF needs and priorities linked to national development strategies.

In 2016, series of workshop organised with the private sector to identify the linkages of the GEF financing window with the private sector to enhance investment and growth within the economy. After the successful implementation of the National Dialogue Initiative (NDI) that involves purely the private sector in the third quarter, there was need to align the suggestions with the GEF financing window provisions under the private sector support. The Agency has now identified a National Approach for private sector involvement to access support from the GEF fund under the non grant instrument. Modalities to facilitate smooth transition will be fully realized in 2017.

2.6.6 Output 5.6: Knowledge of 2000 community people in 4 chiefdoms headquarter Towns on environmental issues increased by 50%
In 2016, the Agency conducted a six-day community sensitization meetings on environmental issues in six chiefdom headquarter towns in Bombali District during the reporting period. The chiefdom headquarters towns were Kalangba and Gbendembu in Gbendembu Gowarhun Chiefdom, Rogboreh in Sanda Taindaren Chiefdom, Makomray in Gbanti Kamaranka Chiefdom and Kamalo in Sanda Loko Chiefdom.

The Agency strong belief on the adage that “Knowledge is Power” continued to engage Local Authorities and their subjects on sound environmental management practices in a campaign titled Village to Village. In the second quarter of 2016 PTT the Agency engaged stakeholders and community people of four chiefdom headquarter Towns in Moyamba District; namely Kagboro, Kaiyamba, Kori and Fakunya Chiefdoms. The third quarter of 2016 precisely on the 24th -30th July, 2016, the Agency engaged stakeholders and community people of four chiefdom headquarter towns in Kono District; namely Sandor, Jaiama Sewafe (Nimiyama Chiefdom), Jaiama Nimikoro, Tankoro and Gbenseh Chiefdoms. These campaigns have help lot in terms of increased knowledge of over 2000 community people in four regions

2.6.7 Output 5.7: Climate change education and public awareness programme improved countrywide by 50 percent
Environment Protection Agency Sierra Leone is charged with the responsibility to initiate and pursue formal and non-formal educational programmes for the creation of public awareness of the environment and its importance to the economic and social life of Sierra Leone. In 2016, the Climate Change Secretariat in collaboration with the Information, Education and Communication department of the Environment Protection Agency held 12 radio discussions and 4 TV programmes on climate change and environment related issues.

Furthermore, the Agency is implementing school nature clubs initiatives and that over 120 teacher coordinators trained and provided with teaching and learning materials and follow ups made on the schools implementing the nature club initiatives. 300 Students are trained as ambassadors of the environment in their respective communities, 50 media practioners were also trained to provide accurate reporting on the climate change to support effective efficient ways of public awareness.

Fig 18 Participant of the Teachers Coordinators Training Displaying their Certificate
2.7 Outcome six: Improved Strategic Innovations and Service Delivery
The following results were achieved under the broad outcome Improved Strategic Innovations and Service Delivery.

2.7.1 Output 6.1: Environmental Performance Rating and Disclosure System implemented in Sierra Leone
In 2016, consultant hired to conduct feasibility study on the appropriateness to install an environmental performance rating and disclosure system. Assessment done and report submitted by the consultant to EPA-SL.

The Agency is proposing to implement the draft plan in the feasibility report in 2017 to ensure that an environmental performance rating and disclosure system is implemented in Sierra Leone before end of 2017.

2.7.2 Output 6.2: Country work programme and projects for Green Climate Fund (GCF) developed
In early 2016, readiness proposal submitted and approved for funding and the Agency was request to undertake a financial systems review with the fund. The initial review was launched which was unsuccessful and later asked to identify a delivery partner. But of recent time the fund has agreed to re-launch the process since we have undertaken two subsequent reviews after the one on 2013 upon which we were assessed.

The Agency during the different quarter of 2016, has engaged MDA’s CSO and private sectors to develop initiatives or project ideas for funding. Priority pipeline projects in the form of work programmes have been identified in the energy, agriculture, water, transport with close linked to the environment developed into a concept and submitted to the Fund for support. Bilateral discussions initiated with the GCF for the identification of delivery partner to support the development of the full proposal.

2.7.3 Output 6.3: Annual Report on Environmental Compliance and Enforcement for 102 companies developed
The Agency monitored One Hundred and Eight (108) companies in 2006 to ensure compliance with the EPA Act of 2008 and the terms and conditions of their respective EIA licences. Sixteen (16) companies notified within this reporting period and Five (5) companies charge to court.

This result will enable the Agency to continuously ensure that companies are adhering to the rules and regulations of the environment in their daily operation to ensure sustainable management of our natural capital.

2.8 Outcome Seven: Improved Institutional Mandate of the Agency
The following results were achieved under the broad outcome Improved Institutional Mandate of the Agency.

2.8.1 Output 7.1: 40 Environmental Social and Health Impact Assessment (ESHIA) reports/Environmental Management Plans (EMPs) received and reviewed by end of 2016
Environmental Impact Assessment licensing process is one of the key tasks of the Agency. The greater the number of projects undertaking EIAs, the more environmental compliance is assured.

The Agency planned to received and reviewed forty (40) EIA/EMPs in 2016, but was able to received and reviewed a total of Forty Two (42) EIA/EMPs in the following quarter one twelve (12) EIA/EMPs, quarter two, ten (10), quarter three , eight (8) and quarter four, twelve (12) .

2.8.2 Output 7.2: 150 EIA licensed projects inspected, monitored and audited for environmental compliance and monitoring reports available. 150 Reports written & Recommendations compiled

A quarterly monitoring plan was developed and implemented to facilitate effective monitoring, inspection and environmental compliance for One Hundred and Fifty (150) reports and report available. In quarter one of 2016, thirty (30) Environmental Impact Assessments (EIA) licensed projects were monitored and report produced. While in Quarter two, three and four, forty projects monitored.

The Agency compiles recommendations of the reports and undertakes follow ups with the respective companies to ensure that they are in compliance with the recommendations of their projects.

2.8.3 Output 7.3: 20 new companies acquired EIA Licences in compliance with the EPA Act 2008 as amended in 2010
All projects activities that affect the environment are required by the EPA Act to acquire an EIA license. This improves economic growth, manages natural resources and governance and Public sector reform; pillars one, two and seven of the Agenda for Prosperity and also are in line with sustainable development goal 12: ensure sustainable consumption and production patterns.

During the reporting period the Agency planned to ensure twenty (20) new companies’ projects acquired EIA licences through the identification and issuance of a notification letter. The Agency was able to accomplished forty two (42) in the following respectively quarter one, twelve (12), quarter two, twelve (12), quarter three twelve (12) and quarter four six (6). Most of the identified new unlicensed projects are in the process of acquiring their EIA’s.

This initiative has helped the Agency to increase it resource mobilization drive which will enhance its operations.

2.9 Outcome Eight: Effective use of donor funds
The following results were achieved under the broad outcome Effective use of donor funds.

2.9.1 Output 8.1: Effective utilization of Global Environment Facility (GEF) resources enhanced through the alignment of development programmes with the Agenda for Prosperity.

The Agency is the GEF focal institution for Sierra Leone with the GEF political and operational focal points to support the implementation of GEF policies and procedures in accordance with project management and fiduciary. The Agency has instituted a GEF coordinating arrangement that meet quarterly to undertake stocktake and peer review of GEF portfolio and report available. Also stocktake for GEF Small Grant conducted for OP5 and OP6 in 2016.

This will help to build synergies between GEF small grant and the medium and full size projects endorsed for Sierra Leone.

2.9.2 Output 8.2: Climate Change National circumstances and Biennial Update Report project developed and institutional arrangement established
In 2016, the Agency signed the Biennial Update Report contract with United Nations Environmental Programme (UNEP) very late and implementation actually commences in the fourth quarter. An inception workshop already held to define the scope of work in terms of the institutional arrangement and stocktake conducted to identify the gaps in the national communications supported by the UNEP.

The Agency is in the verge of developing the detail project implementation plan for submission to UNEP for funding for next year.

2.9.3 Output 8.3 Climate Change Mitigation actions and their effects, including associated methodologies and assumptions project developed and implemented
During the reporting period the Agency developed terms of reference and retained a consultant in the fourth quarter of 2016, since this activity is strongly linked to the BUR funds provided by UNEP for the implementation of activities in 2016/17.

The implementation will fully commence in January 2017, in terms of undertaking desk review and data compilation to enable the development of draft report on the NAMA.
2.9.4 Output 8.4: Domestic Measurement Reporting and Verification (MRV) on Emission Reduction Project developed and enhanced implementation
During the reporting period the Agency developed terms of reference and retained a consultant in the fourth quarter of 2016, since this activity is strongly linked to the BUR funds provided by UNEP for the implementation of activities in 2016/17.

The implementation will fully commence in January 2017, in terms of undertaking desk review and data compilation to enable the development of draft report on the MRV.

CHAPTER THREE

3.0 Challenges and Lessons Learned

3.1 Challenges
Reflecting on the relentless efforts to protecting Sierra Leone’s environment and its natural resources, the EPA-SL has been hailed country wide as successful. However, the success has been associated with significant challenges which continue to undermine national efforts towards the protection and management of the Environment and its natural resources. Some of the main challenges encountered include the following:
1. Low level of awareness and appreciation of environmental issues, particularly among mining, manufacturing industries, tourism, agriculture and other related sectors. This increases the cost of monitoring and enforcement, although EIA and other environmental best practice generally benefits the developers and proponents. Partly due to limited appreciation and lack of understanding of environmental issues, MDAs and proponents of development projects have the wrong perception of the EPA-SL as an institution derailing investment and development in the country. However, as a regulatory body, the agency considers the effective protection and management of the environment and its natural resources pivotal towards achieving poverty reduction and sustainable development. The effort by the Agency to enhance environmental protection and management may not be sustainably achieved without continued support from all relevant stakeholders. Therefore MDAs and the private sector have the responsibility to mainstream the environment in their policies, plans, programmes and projects to ensure that present and future generation benefits from the sustainable utilization of the environment and its natural resources.

2. Limited human resource and institutional capacity – despite the existence of sectoral environmental guidelines, regulations and safeguards, environmental consultants do not have adequate knowledge and skills in environmental mainstreaming into Environmental, Social, and Health Impact Assessment (ESHIA) conducted for their proponents, hence the quality of EIA reports submitted is generally low.

3. The capacity for environmental inspection and compliance monitoring of the EPA-SL is limited due to the unavailability of adequate monitoring equipment for onsite testing and analysis.

4. Failure of stakeholders to adhere to the law due to the general milieu in the society that non compliance with environmental law will not lead to any punitive actions.

5. Weak coordination and tardy Monitoring and Implementation, resulting in delayed responses to emerging environmental threats.

6. Inadequate cooperation between MDAs resulting in insufficient information sharing leading to proponents violating the law.

7. The absence of readily available security personnel and capacity to facilitate the enforcement of the law.

8. Limited understanding by the citizenry of the remit of EPA-SL mandate.
9. The absence of an environmental court or tribunal to expedite the trial of environmental matters
3.2 Lesson Learned
A number of lessons have been learned during the implementation of the operational plans of the 2012-2016 strategic action plan that will form the Agency’s further effort to ensure the realization of sustainable environmental protection and management for the 2017-2021 implementation periods. These lessons are very important to Sierra Leone as a country faced with several challenges in such areas as poverty, sustainable economic transformation and good governance, an illiterate population, severely degraded and dwindling natural resource base, changing climate and an increasing vulnerabilities. Few tangible lessons learned are as follows:
1. Environment and development are inseparably inter-linked. They should not conflict but be mutually reinforcing. Environmental institutions ought to be perceived in positive light – as architects rather than detractors of development. This change of perception is often a slow process, requiring multi-dimensional interventions including excessive sensitization and demonstrative advocacy such as urban greening, reforestation, biodiversity restoration and integrated technology etc.
2. Financing Project based activities can help achieve quick wins in restoring the environment in demonstrating benefits from good integrated environmental management practices, and enhancing capacity. The Environmental governance project funded by the European Union, the UNDP Sustainable Land Management Projects and several other Agency led project has demonstrated striking gains in building capacities, enhancing Governance and restoring the environment. Small uncoordinated projects are usually associated with high transaction costs and can easily erode rather than develop long-term institutional capacity; and cannot support achieving country-wide long-term environmental management goals. This is because funding is usually small, unpredictable and marred by bureaucratic procedures which tend to favor short-term planning. For the 2017-2021 implementations, it is important to focus on sector-wide and cross-sectoral environmental intervention and developing sustainable institutional capacity to drive the Agency, other sectors and the country towards achieving the Sustainable development and green growth.
3. Solid political will characterized by committed and focused leadership, is important in sprouting a suitable environmental program where there are overwhelming interests for apparently more tangible, politically sensitive, short-term infrastructural, livelihoods and economic development concerns. The political environment has also fostered a policy for innovation and reform, which have aided compliance with environmental requirements of the development projects and the Agency cooperation at regional and international levels to enhance the Country’s commitment to Multilateral Environmental Agreement

4. Institutional collaboration and coordination are critical to achieving results, even with limited capacity and resources. Effective enforcement of the environmental policy and law has not depended on EPA-SL efforts alone. It has and will succeed because of excellent collaboration and partnership between different institutions across government, the private and civil society sectors, and support from external development partners. In the 2017-2021 strategic action plan implementation, this collaboration would be strengthened because of the stepped up strategic approach to creating synergies.

5. While a lot has been achieved in the 2016 Performance Tracking Table and the previous four years, the Agency wish to perform much better in mobilizing external resources, coordinating stakeholders’ efforts and developing more solid capacity, in the next five year through the effective implementation of the 2017 -2021 strategic action plan of the EPA-SL.

Name of Institution: ENVIRONMENT PROTECTION AGENCY SIERRA LEONE
SUMMARY BENCH MARK IMPACT INDICATORS FOR 2016 PERFORMANCE TRACKING TABLE(Aligning the A4P, CPIA AND SDGs TO OUTCOMES AND OUTPUTS
IMPLEMENTING PERIOD: JANUARY – DECEMBER, 2016
Output Baseline SLIBS
A4P CPIA SDGs
(specific deliverable at the end of 2016) (status at end of 2015/ start of 2016)
Outcome One: Policy Support, Formulation and Dissemination Enhanced
1.1 EPA-SL Act of 2008 amended An existing EPA Act of 2008 which was amended in 2010. However, the amendment only covered administrative issues. EPA Act, 2008 failed to address emerging environmental challenges such as climate change, fees for violation and litigation, gender and natural resources management issues. Pillar 2 & 7 on Managing natural resources, governance & public sector reform: Reflecting emerging environmental issues and climate change in the amended Act of 2008 will contribute to ensure good environmental governance of natural resources and adherence to international best practice for sound environmental management, and strengthen the level of implementing environmental standards and regulations to ensure compliance and enforcement to enhance effective natural resources management through environmental, social and health impact assessments(ESHIA) and monitoring projects that make use of the physical environment. Criteria C: Policies for social inclusion/equity. The final amendment of the 2008 EPA Act will provide support to policies, institutional strengthening and legislative frameworks for environmental sustainability and climate change adaptation and mitigation. SDG Goals 11,13,14,15 & 16: Amendment of the EPA Act, 2008 will provide the legal framework for the development of national policies and legislation to build and strengthen environmental institutions to address climate change and promote environmental justice and peace in achieving poverty reduction, inclusive and sustainable development.
1.2. Environmental Regulations on Sand mining, Tourism and Manufacturing sectors developed An existing EPA Act of 2008, which was amended in 2010, 2013 mines and environmental protection regulations. Pillars 1, 2 , 4 &7 on Diversified economic growth, managing natural resources, international competitiveness and governance: This activity will contribute to ensuring responsible and sustainable sand mining practices that will mitigate the impact of climate change, support life under water and on land, conserve ecosystem services, ensure economic diversification and provide sustained Labour and employment, and livelihoods for Sierra Leoneans, particularly the youths. Criteria C: Policies for social inclusion/equity.
Specifically: Policies and institution for environmental sustainability through the enactment of these regulations will ensure environmental integrity of our land and coastal environments and minimize pollution for human health and wellbeing of Sierra Leoneans. Goals 11,12, 13 &15. This output will contribute towards enhancing sustainable consumption and production patterns, mitigate climate change and ensure sustainable cities and effective protection and maangment of the Sierra Leone’s environment. Environment.
1.3 Environment Protection Agency Sierra Leone Service Charter widely popularised Existing service charter displayed at Headquarters and Regional Offices Pillar 2: Managing Natural resources through a well-informed population of the country on the importance of environment and for its effective protection and sustainable management of its natural resources Criteria C: Policies for social inclusion/equity.
Specifically: Policies and institution for environmental sustainability through the enactment and implementation of these regulations. Popularization of the EPA-SL Service Charter will enhance environmental sustainability through public understanding of the functions of the environment protection agency, creating the enabling environment for effective policy implementation and the need for conserving our biodiversity and ecosystem services. Goals 12, 13,14.15 ensuring sustainable consumption and production patterns of our natural resources, combating climate change, protect, restore and promote sustainable use of terrestrial, coastal and marine ecosystems through increased awareness and knowledge.
1.4 Certification scheme on refrigerant and air condition technicians established No existing certification scheme for refrigerant and air condition technicians. Pillar 1. Diversified economic growth. This provides certification for Sierra Leoneans to gain international recognition in refrigeration and promotes country drive towards climate change action and protection of the stratospheric ozone layer. Criteria C of the CPIA : Certified Technicians will help to promote the elimination of ozone depleting substances through education and awareness raising and public participation to ensure protection of the ozone layer. Goals 9 & 13. This output promotes responsible care in industry, innovation and infrastructure, Responsible care also promotes climate action by reducing ozone depleting substances with high global warming potential and health related disease.
Four International environmental days( World Environment Day, World Wetland Day, World Ozone Day and World GIS day) celebrated Pillar 2 – This will increase knowledge and awareness raising in environmental issues and the need to promote sound environmental and natural resource management practices in Sierra Leone. Criteria C: Policies for social inclusion/equity.
Specifically: Policies and institution for environmental sustainability through education and awareness raising on the eradication of ozone depleting substances and mainstreaming environment into socio-economic development to ensure poverty reduction and ecological restoration. Goals 2, 3, 12,14 & 15 on zero hunger, good health &wellbeing, responsible consumption and production and life on land. Increase Knowledge and awareness on the important of ozone protection and elimination of ODS will reduce skin cancer and blindness, eliminate the use of ODS, prevent harmful rays from the sun to protect organisms on land and promote plant growth for food and agriculture. Will also ensure sustainable consumption and production patterns of our natural resources combating climate change protect, restore and promote sustainable use of terrestrial ecosystems through increased awareness and knowledge.
Outcome Two: Effective Contribution to the Implementation of the Agenda for Prosperity
2.1. Environmental Management Information Systems (EMIS) for Natural Resources in Sierra Leone Developed AfP Pillar 2 NRM No existing Environmental Management Information Systems for Natural Resources in Sierra Leone Pillar 2 – To promote sound environmental management practices in Sierra Leone through proper planning for effective use of natural resources. Criteria C: Inform policy for effective utilization of natural resources and promote social inclusion Goals 2, 5, 8, 10 , 12, 13 ,14 &15 on zero hunger, gender equity, good health &wellbeing, decent work and economic growth , reduced inequalities, responsible consumption and production . The availability of accurate data and information for proper planning will contribute to effective use of natural resources, sustainable consumption and production patterns of our natural resources, combating climate change, protect, restoration of terrestrial ecosystems through increased awareness and knowledge.
2.2 Strategic Environmental Assessment (SEA) of Artisanal mining Sector of Sierra Leone Conducted No existing Strategic Environmental Assessment (SEA) of the Artisanal mining Sector of Sierra Leone Pillar 2 – To promote sound environmental management practices for the artisanal mining sector in Sierra Leone. Informed policy for effective decision making. Will contribute to Goal 15 through addressing environmental degradation caused by artisanal mining.
2.3 Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) Spatial Database management system established No existing Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) Spatial Database management system Agenda for prosperity Pillar 2 as a responsibility to provide a key overview role in the management of the country’s natural resources. Inform policy for effective decision making. Goal 12, will contribute to the effective use of natural resources, sustainable consumption and production patterns, combating climate change, protect, restoration of terrestrial ecosystems through increased awareness and knowledge.
2.4 Community Based Natural Resources Governance Strengthened through Building Capacity of 4 Local councils in forest edge and Pastoral Communities Weak community based natural resources governance structure in place Pillar 2 for effective coordination on the management of Sierra Leone’s Natural Resources Enhancing the protection of the Natural resources through the involvement of local communities in the management of the country’s Natural Resources for environmental sustainability. Goals 11,12, 13 &15. This activity will contribute towards enhancing effective sustainable consumption and production patterns, reduce climate change impact, ensure sustained city and ensure sustainable protection of the Environment.
2.5. Environmental spatial data collection plan implemented and a Web GIS portal established The Environmental Spatial Database collection plan available but not implemented. No existing web GIS central portal available Pillar 2 as a responsibility to provide key information in the management of the country’s natural resources Enhancing environmental sustainability through the availability of accurate data and information for proper planning to effectively protect and manage the environment and its natural resources. Inform policy for effective decision making to enhance the sustainable management the environment and the country’s natural resources SDG 12 addressing the issue of sustainable production and consumption patterns
2.6 National Ozone protection programmes enhanced through effective collaboration and coordination Existing Steering Committee on Hydrochloroflorocarbon Phase-out Management Plan (HPMP) and HPMP available Pillar 2: Managing natural resources. This supports effective collaboration in ensuring reduced impact to the environment Positively impact air pollution and climate change. It also build human resource linked to C9 of CPIA criteria Goal 13: reduces adverse effect on climate and increasing control of environmental pollution to protect the environment from global warming and improvement of air quality.
2.7 8 schools trained and supported with sustainable waste management practices 8 schools provided with 40 giant dust bins. Pillar 3: supports human development by providing minimal impacts from airborne diseases and offensive odour Enhances the protection of marine resources, pollution and promote circular economy Goals 3 and 8. Promotes good health and wellbeing of Sierra Leoneans. Decent work and economic growth is also affected positively. Waste to wealth supports circular economy in ensuring zero waste within the environment and promote inclusive and sustainable economic growth.
2.8 Intended Nationally Determined Contributions for Sierra Leone effectively reviewed and Roadmap for implementation developed Intended Nationally Determined Contributions for Sierra Leone available Pillar 1, 2& 4 Diversified economic growth, Managing Natural Resource and International Competitiveness. The roadmap will provide opportunity for Sierra Leone to gain international recognition and mobilize resources to promote country driven approaches towards climate change actions. Public participation is key in developing the roadmap which involves integrating the different sector strategies into the road map as miles stones for effective implementation of the nationally determined contributions (NDC) on climate change Implementation Plan. SDG 7, 8 , 9 &13. The roadmap promotes responsible care in industry, innovation and infrastructure. Responsible care also promotes climate action by ensuring emission reduction in certain industrial activities with high global warming potential as part of the NDC actions to reduce emission targets. Encourage sustained economic growth by achieving higher levels of productivity through technological innovation and building synergies in implementation.
2.9 Climate Change demonstration initiative strengthened through effective monitoring of 6 existing projects and enhanced the implementation of nine new projects 6 existing climate change demonstration projects Pillar 2: Managing natural resources. This supports effective collaboration in ensuring reduced impact to the environment by undertaking climate change initiatives that will lead to sustainable environmental practices. Positive impact on climate change initiatives that build into the policies and institutions for environmental sustainability which is part of the core indicators for CPIA assessment. SDG 12 & 13: This initiative implemented in Schools will expand on the concept of responsible consumption and production. Also reduces adverse effect on climate increasing control contribution to protecting the environment from global warming
2.10 Mined out rehabilitation plan for five large scale mining companies implemented Engagement plan for mined out rehabilitation of large scale mining companies available Agenda for Prosperity Pillar 2: Ensuring effective management of the natural resources and Environment. Criteria C: Policies for social inclusion/equity: This activity will ensure environmental sustainability through the implementation of reclamation plans. Help restore the mined out areas through the enforcement of policy to enhance environmental sustainability. Goals 1, 2, 6, 11,12, 13 &15. This activity will contribute towards enhancing effective sustainable consumption and production patterns, reduction of poverty, hunger and climate change impact, ensure clean water and proper sanitation, sustained city and ensure sustainable protection of the Environment.
Outcome Three: Improved Institutional Reforms and functions.
3.1. National Baseline information report on contaminated sites available No existing baseline report on contaminated sites in Sierra Leone Pillar 3: Contaminated sites affect human development. By mapping these sites is a huge step in ensuring effective management and clean-up of these areas. Water pollution, waste, freshwater resources, marine and coastal issues, ecosystem and biodiversity could be protected by effectively managing effluents from companies. Goals 3 & 6. Sound environmental management of contaminated sites supports good health and wellbeing and also minimizes pollution from point sources of water.
3.2 Assessment report on Environmental Load of waste waters/effluents from six manufacturing companies in Freetown available Existing reported baseline data on effluents of 6 manufacturing companies available Pillar 2: Releases of effluent from manufacturing and other companies will endanger natural resource management. Therefore monitoring these waste waters will enhance the protection of our natural resources by applying mitigation strategies. Water pollution, waste, freshwater resources, marine and coastal issues, ecosystem and biodiversity could be protective by effectively managing effluent from companies Goals 14 & 15: Effluents could affect life under water and Land. Managing its release will address the negative impacts.
3.3. National Climate Change Strategy and Action Plan (NCCS&AP) Response Programme implemented National Climate Change Strategy & Action Plan document available. Pillar 2: Managing natural resources. This supports effective collaboration in ensuring reduced impact to the environment and sustainable management of natural resources. . Positive impact on climate change initiatives that build into the policies and institutions for environmental sustainability which is part of the core indicators for CPIA assessment. Goal 13: reduces adverse effects of climate change and protect the country from global warming through the implementation of the proposed strategies in the submitted proposals for funding.
3.4 Costs imposed by the Sierra Leone floods of September 2015 in Freetown Assessed and Quantified. No existing assessment report on loss and damage as a result of climate change impacts in Sierra Leone Pillar 2: Managing natural resources. This supports effective collaboration in ensuring reduced impact to the environment and sustainable management of natural resources. It provides a clear cost and benefit guidelines to support decision making. . Positive impact on climate change initiatives that build into the policies and institutions for environmental sustainability which is part of the core indicators for CPIA assessment. Goal 13: reduces adverse effect on climate change and protect the country from global warming through the implementation of the proposed strategies in the submitted proposals for funding.
3.5 Economic Implications of Environmental Degradation assessed. No existing assessment report on economic implications of environmental degradation in Sierra Leone Pillar 2: Managing natural resources. This supports effective decision making in ensuring reduced impact to the environment and sustainable management of natural resources. It provides a clear cost and benefit guidelines to support decision making in the management of the Environment Criteria C: Inform policy for effective utilization of natural resources and promote social inclusion Inform policy for effective decision making to develop sound policies and legislation for environmental sustainability . Goals 1 , 2, 3, 56, 10, 12 & 15: This report will assist in the proper planning of environmental protection and management to develop polices and legislation that will reduce poverty and hunger, responsible management of natural resources and good human health and wellbeing. Goals 12, 13,14.15 ensuring sustainable consumption and production patterns of our natural resources combating climate change protect, restore and promote sustainable use of terrestrial ecosystems through increased awareness and knowledge
3.6 Compendium of Environmental Research Projects for Sierra Leone undertaken from 2005 – 2015 compiled No consolidated information on Environmental Research undertaken available Pillar 1 & 2: Research supports all aspects of economic growth and Natural resource protection Research supports effective policies for environmental protection This activity contributes to Goals 8,12,13,14, & 15 to promote effective management of our environment, ensure protection of water, forest and other sensitive ecologies.
Outcome Four: Improved Capacity
4.1 32 Technical and Admin staff trained. 4 staff trained in Communication material development; 5 staff in the use of GHG inventory; 16 trained in Climate Change programme on Adaptation and Mitigation; 20 trained in SEA/EIA refresher; 10 in database development and management; 20 in GIS application in Environmental Monitoring; 1 attended an executive training in the Extractive Industry; 6 trained on Montreal Protocol and the HPMP. Pillars 2, 3 & 8 on managing natural resources, accelerating human development and gender and women’s empowerment : This activity will provide staff with the required knowledge and skills for the effective protection and management of its natural resources. Pillars 3 & 4 :A capacitate nationals with high technical strength to deliver task effectively and efficiently in response to the growing environmental challenges ,whilst at the same time reducing dependence on foreign experts. Criteria C: Policies for social inclusion/equity.
Specifically: Policies and institution for environmental sustainability through the attainment of quality training to environmental issues and climate change for environmental sustainability. Pillar 3 & 4 capacitate nationals with high technical strength to deliver task effectively and efficiently in response to the growing environmental challenges ,whilst at the same time reducing dependence on foreign experts. This activity contributes to Goals 8,12,13,14, & 15. It will promote the effective management of our environment, ensure protection of water, forest and other sensitive ecologies.
4.2 4 Short term contract, 2 consultants and 9 staff recruited to enhance the daily operations of the Agency 7 Short term contract; 3 consultants hired and 12 staff recruited. Pillar 3 & 4 : Capacitate nationals with high technical strength to deliver task effectively and efficiently in response to the growing environmental challenges ,whilst at the same time reducing dependence on foreign experts. Enhance environmental sustainability through public understanding of the function of the Agency and effectively implementing policies, laws and international best practice guidelines by staff of the agency. This activity contributes to Goals 8,12,13,14, & 15. It will promote the effective management of our environment; ensure protection of water, forest and other sensitive ecologies.
4.3 The accreditation support process through capacity building enhanced No accredited national implementing entity for climate change funded projects available . Pillars 1, 2& 4 Diversified economic growth, Managing Natural Resource and International Competitiveness. The accreditation support process will provide opportunity for Sierra Leone to gain international recognition and mobilize resources to promote country drive approaches towards climate change action. This initiative will support the sector’s efficiency, depth, and resource mobilization strength which is a core indicator requirement for government under the CPIA structural policies relating to the finance sector. Goals 7, 8 , 9 &13. The resources acquired through the accredited entity can promote affordable and clean energy initiatives, responsible care in industry, innovation and infrastructure. Responsible care also promote climate action by ensuring reducing emission reduction in certain industrial activities with high global warming potential as part of the government action. Encourage sustained economic growth by achieving higher levels of productivity through technological innovation and building synergies in implementation of the resources and ensure effective management of natural resources.
4.4 EPA -SL 85 staff welfare improved Renewed medical insurance scheme for 2015. Emergency preparedness plan available. HR manual conditions of service drafted. 1st HR development plan drafted; 4 general staff and 12 chief meetings held. ; 4 staff welfare sessions held Pillar 3 & 4 :A capacitate nationals with enabling environment to deliver task effectively and efficiently in response to the growing environmental challenges ,whilst at the same time reducing dependence on foreign experts. Section C, point 11: Social Protection, Gender Equity and effective human resource management This activity contributes to Goals 8,12,13,14, & 15. It will promote the effective management of our environment, ensure protection of water, forest and other sensitive ecologies.
4.5 30 media practioners and 40 Teacher coordinators trained for effective communication on environmental management 25 media practitioners and 25 teacher coordinators trained for effective communication on environmental management Pillar 2: Managing Natural resources through a well-informed population of the country on the importance of environment Enhance environmental sustainability through public understanding of the function of the environment protection agency, creating the enabling environment for effective policy implementation Goals 12, 13,14.15 ensuring sustainable consumption and production patterns of our natural resources, combating climate change, protect, restore and promote sustainable use of terrestrial ecosystems through increased awareness and knowledge.
4.6 25 EPA Technical staff,5staff of the law officers department,10 members of the Sierra Leone Bar Association, 4 staff of the Environmental Crimes Division, 19 environmental officers of the Local Councils, 5CSO members, 5 NGO members and 5 media practitioners trained on the guidelines on Environmental Compliance, Enforcement and Prosecution 48 police officers trained on environmental investigation and prosecution Pillars 3 & 4 :A capacitate nationals with high technical strength to deliver task effectively and efficiently in response to the growing environmental challenges ,whilst at the same time reducing dependence on foreign experts. Enhance environmental sustainability through public understanding of the function of the Agency and effectively implementing policies, laws and international best practice guidelines by different stakeholders. This activity contributes to Goals 8,12,13,14, & 15. It will promote the effective management of our environment; ensure protection of water, forest and other sensitive ecologies.
4.7 30 Parliamentarians, Twelve (12) Civil Society Organization (CSOs) members and Two(2) Legal practioners and 30 University students trained on Multilateral Environmental Agreements (MEAs) and environmental management Inadequate knowledge of MEAs and environmental management by parliamentarians and CSOs Pillars 3 & 4 :A capacitate nationals with high technical strength to deliver task effectively and efficiently in response to the growing environmental challenges ,whilst at the same time reducing dependence on foreign experts. Enhance environmental sustainability through Stakeholders understanding and effectively implementing policies, laws and international best practice. This activity contributes to Goals 8,12,13,14, & 15. It will promote the effective management of our environment, ensure protection of water, forest and other sensitive ecologies.
4.8 110 police officers trained on environmental laws, investigation and prosecution 50 police officers in the western area trained on environmental investigation and prosecution Pillars 3 & 4 :A capacitate nationals with high technical strength to deliver task effectively and efficiently in response to the growing environmental challenges ,whilst at the same time reducing dependence on foreign experts. Enhance environmental sustainability through Stakeholders understanding and effectively implementing policies, laws and international best practice. This activity contributes to Goals 8,12,13,14, & 15. It will promote the effective management of our environment, ensure protection of water, forest and other sensitive ecologies.
4.9 122 registered companies sensitized on the EPA Act of 2008 and its Regulations. Inadequate understanding and knowledge of companies of the EPA Act of 2008 and its Regulations. Pillar 2: Managing Natural resources through a well-informed population of the country on the importance of environment Enhance environmental sustainability through public understanding of the function of the environment protection agency, creating the enabling environment for effective policy implementation Goals 12, 13,14.15 ensuring sustainable consumption and production patterns of our natural resources, combating climate change, protect, restore and promote sustainable use of terrestrial ecosystems through increased awareness and knowledge
4.10 4 television and 16 radio discussions held on the EPA Act of 2008 and its Regulations for continued public awareness. TV and Radio discussions held on the EPA Act and Regulations for the general public. Pillar 2: Managing Natural resources through a well-informed population of the country on the importance of environment Enhance environmental sustainability through public understanding of the function of the environment protection agency, creating the enabling environment for effective policy implementation Goals 12, 13,14.15 ensuring sustainable consumption and production patterns of our natural resources, combating climate change protect, restore and promote sustainable use of terrestrial ecosystems through increased awareness and knowledge.
4.11 20 EPA Technical staff capacity on the Geographic Information Systems (GIS) enhanced EPA technical staff trained in basic GIS Pillars 3 & 4 :A capacitate nationals with high technical strength to deliver task effectively and efficiently in response to the growing environmental challenges ,whilst at the same time reducing dependence on foreign experts. Enhance environmental sustainability through public understanding of the function of the Agency and effectively implementing policies, laws and international best practice guidelines by staff of the agency. This activity contributes to Goals 8,12,13,14, & 15. It will promote the effective management of our environment, ensure protection of water, forest and other sensitive ecologies.
Outcome Five: Cross-Cutting Issues: coordination, collaboration, corporate governance issues, social issues, climate, research, synergies, CSR etc
5.1. Ozone Depleting Substances (ODS) regulations enforced and fifteen import/export licences for the control of ODS issued. 200 customs and other law enforcement officers trained on the Montreal Protocol and use of refrigerant ODS identifiers Pillar 7: Increase strong institutions by increasing the level of implementing regulations on ozone depleting substances Supports policy and institutions for environmental sustainability Goals 3, 13 & 16: Contributes to ensuring healthy lives and promote wellbeing, combating climate change, peace, Justice and strong institutions.
5.2 Ozone friendly practices initiated by six companies in compliance with the 2010 national ODS regulations. ODS database framework available Contributes to effective climate action and natural resource protection. Supports policy and institutions for environmental sustainability. Contributes to effective climate action and ensuring healthy lives and promote wellbeing,
5.3 Collaboration and cooperation with 8 women groups on Climate smart Agriculture, and other environmental issues enhanced Existing collaboration and cooperation with three women groups to environmental issues Pillar 1: Diversified economic growth through sustainable agricultural practices.
Pillar 5: Labour and Employment; this activity provides sustainable employment for women and
Pillar 8: Gender and women’s empowerment. CPIA Section C points 7,8, 10 & 11. The activity promote Gender Empowerment, enhance social protection, ensure equitable public resource use and foster environmental sustainability Goals 1, 2 &10 reducing general poverty prevalence among women through climate smart agriculture.
Goal 12: Contributing to ensure sustainable consumption and production patterns
5.4 Three (3) Community reforestation projects established in three(3) local council areas. One Environmental Unit in place at each of 18 local Councils Reforestation projects uphold management of natural resources, accelerating human development, labour and employment and social protection for community members. Thus, it is clear that a regulatory institution like the EPA-SL implements these projects in line with the Agenda for Prosperity’s pillars two, three, five and six. CPIA Section C point 11. The activity foster environmental sustainability Also the activity contributes to goals 13 and 15 which enhance taking urgent action to combat climate change and it impacts and also to protect, restore and promote sustainable use of terrestrial ecosystems, sustainably manage forest, combat desertification and halt, reverse land degradation and halt biodiversity loss.
5.5 Capacity building on accessing GEF fund for the private sector enhanced through identifying Investment priorities under the Global Environment Facility (GEF) for the private sector. Nine (9) Existing investment priorities in the Global Environment Facility (GEF) programme. No investment priorities for the private sector identified. Pillar 2: Managing natural resources. This support to create effective collaboration in ensuring reduced impact to the environment and sustainable management of natural resources. . Positive impact on climate change initiatives that build into the policies and institutions for environmental sustainability which is part of the core indicators for CPIA assessment. Goal 13: reduces adverse effect on climate change and global warming through the implementation of the proposed strategies in the submitted proposals for funding.
5.6 Knowledge of 2000 community people in 4 chiefdoms headquarter Towns on environmental issues increased by 50% 30% achieved by 2015 through Community sensitization on environmental issues in Kailahun District. No existing community environmental club This activity contributed to:
Pillar 2 Managing natural resources through informed citizenry on sound environmental practices. Enhance environmental sustainability through public understanding of the function of the environment protection agency, creating the enabling environment for effective policy implementation This activity contributes to Goal 12 to ensure sustainable consumption and production patterns through sound livelihood practices and Goal 13: Take urgent action to combat climate change and its impacts through community awareness campaigns.
5.7 Climate change education and public awareness programme improved countrywide by 50 percent . 30 percent achieved by 2015 through radio and TV panel discussions, jingles, community sensitizations etc. Pillar 2: Managing natural resources. This activities will raise awareness of proper handling of our natural capital for sustainable development. Public participation is key in this process to ensure that the transfer of knowledge from the environmental ambassadors from the school nature clubs to the general public that will facilitate change in their approach in dealing with environment and climate change issues Goals 12 & 13: This initiative implemented in Schools will expand on the concept of responsible consumption and production patterns. Also reduces adverse effects of climate change and global warming
Outcome Six: Improved Strategic Innovation (Service Delivery)
6.1 Environmental Performance Rating and Disclosure System implemented in Sierra Leone No existing environmental performance rating and disclosure system available Pillars 3 & 4 : Capacitate national Staff with high technical strength to deliver task effectively and efficiently in response to the growing environmental challenges ,whilst at the same time reducing dependence on foreign experts. Enhance environmental sustainability through public understanding of the function of the Agency and effectively implementing policies, laws and international best practice guidelines by staff of the agency. This activity contributes to Goals 8,12,13,14, & 15. It will promote the effective management of our environment, ensure protection of water, forest and other sensitive ecologies.
6.2 Country work programme and projects for Green Climate Fund (GCF) developed 6.2 No existing GCF funded country programme. Pillars 1, 2 & 4 Diversified economic growth, Managing Natural Resource and International Competitiveness. This initiative will provide adequate support to the implementation of environmental sustainable programmes in the areas of affordable and clean energy initiatives, innovation and good infrastructural development that will lead to climate actions which support a resilient economy.. Positive impact on climate change initiatives that build into the policies and institutions for environmental sustainability which is part of the core indicators for CPIA assessment. Goals 7, 8 , 9 &13. The resources acquired through the readiness proposal can promote affordable and clean energy initiatives, responsible care in industry, innovation and infrastructure. ensuring reducing emission reduction in certain industrial activities with high global warming potential as part of the government action. Encourage sustained economic growth by achieving higher levels of productivity through technological innovation and building synergies in implementation of the management of natural resources.
6.3 Annual Report on Environmental Compliance and Enforcement for 102 companies developed No annual holistic report on environmental compliance and enforcement available. Individual annual environmental monitoring reports of 80 companies available. Pillars 2 & 7: Increase strong institutions by increasing the level of implementing regulations on environmental standards to ensure compliance and enhance effective natural resources management Enforcing environmental regulations for the environmental sustainability in line with Section C point11 of the CPIA criteria. This activity contributes to 12 in ensuring sustainable consumption and production patterns through sound livelihood practices and Goal 13: Take urgent action to combat climate change and its impacts through community awareness campaign.
Outcome Seven: Improved Institutional Mandate and functions
7.1. 40 Environmental Social and Health Impact Assessment (ESHIA) reports/Environmental Management Plans (EMPs) received and reviewed by end of 2016 35 ESHIAs/EMPs received and reviewed. Pillars 2 & 7: Increase strong institutions by increasing the level of implementing regulations on environmental standards to enhance effective natural resources management. Enforcing environmental regulations for environmental sustainability, in line with Section C point11 of the CPIA criteria. This activity contributes to Goals 12 & 15: ensuring sustainable consumption and production patterns and protecting, restoring and promote sustainable use of terrestrial ecosystems, sustainably manage forest, combat desertification and halt and reverse land degradation and halt biodiversity
This activity contributes to Goals 12 & 15: ensuring sustainable consumption and production patterns and protecting, restoring and promote sustainable use of terrestrial ecosystems, sustainably manage forest, combat desertification and halt and reverse land degradation and halt biodiversity
7.2. 150 EIA licenced projects inspected, monitored and audited for environmental compliance and monitoring reports available. 150 Reports written & Recommendations compiled 150 EIA projects monitored This activity contributes to Pillar 2 on Managing natural resources and Pillar 7 on Governance and public reform Enforcing environmental regulations for environmental sustainability, in line with Section C point 11 of the CPIA criteria This activity contributes to Goals 12 & 15: ensuring sustainable consumption and production patterns and protecting, restoring and promote sustainable use of terrestrial ecosystems, sustainably manage forest, combat desertification and halt and reverse land degradation and halt biodiversity loss.
7.3. 20 new companies acquired EIA Licences in compliance with the EPA Act 2008 as amended in 2010 107 companies with EIA licences by 2015. This activity contributes to Pillar 2 Managing natural resources and Pillar 7: Governance and public reform Enforcing environmental regulations for environmental sustainability, in line with Section C point11 of the CPIA criteria. This activity contributes to Goals 12 & 15: ensuring sustainable consumption and production patterns and protecting, restoring and promote sustainable use of terrestrial ecosystems, sustainably manage forest, combat desertification and halt and reverse land degradation and halt biodiversity.
7.4. Atlas of 20 Ecologically sensitive sites produced. No comprehensive atlas on ecologically sensitive sites. This activity contributes to Pillar 2 Managing natural resources and Pillar 7: Governance and public reform Inform Policy for effective decision to enhance environmental sustainability in line Section C point11 of the CPIA criteria protecting, restoring and promote sustainable use of terrestrial ecosystems, sustainably manage forest, combat desertification and halt and reverse land degradation and halt biodiversity
7.5 Environmental awareness raising improved in 40 educational institutions (15 primary, 20 secondary and 5 tertiary institutions) 110 nature clubs established in 70 Secondary Schools. Pillars 2&7: Strengthen effective management of the Country’s Natural Resources and good environmental Governance through environmental education Enhance environmental sustainability through public understanding of the function of the environment protection agency, creating the enabling environment for effective policy implementation This activity contributes to Goals 12 & 15: ensuring sustainable consumption and production patterns and protecting, restoring and promote sustainable use of terrestrial ecosystems, sustainably manage forest, combat desertification and halt and reverse land degradation and halt biodiversity.
Outcome Eight: Effective use of donor funds
8.1. Effective utilization of Global Environment Facility (GEF) resources enhanced through the alignment of development programmes with the Agenda for Prosperity. 14 projects funded by GEF (7 completed and 7 ongoing) Pillar 2: Managing natural resources. This supports create effective collaboration in ensuring reduced impact to the environment and sustainable management of natural resources. . Positive impact on climate change initiatives that build into the policies and institutions for environmental sustainability which is part of the core indicators for CPIA assessment. Goals 7, 8 , 9 &13. The resources acquired through the can promote affordable and clean energy initiatives, responsible care in industry, innovation and infrastructure, reducing emission reduction in certain industrial activities with high global warming potential as part of the government action. Encourage sustained economic growth by achieving higher levels of productivity through technological innovation and building synergies in implementation of the resources and ensure effective management of natural resources.
8 .2Climate Change National circumstances and Biennial Update Report project developed and institutional arrangement established No existing Biennial Update Report Project institutional arrangement available. Pillar 2: Managing natural resources. This supports create effective collaboration in ensuring reduced impact to the environment and sustainable management of natural resources. . Positive impact on climate change initiatives that build into the policies and institutions for environmental sustainability which is part of the core indicators for CPIA assessment. Goal 13: reduces adverse effect on climate increasing control contribution to protecting the environment from global warming through the implementation of the proposed strategies in the approved BUR proposal funded.
8.3 Climate Change Mitigation actions and their effects, including associated methodologies and assumptions project developed and implemented. No existing Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions (NAMA) project available. Pillar 2: Managing natural resources. This supports create effective collaboration in ensuring reduced impact to the environment and sustainable management of natural resources. . Positive impact on climate change initiatives that build into the policies and institutions for environmental sustainability which is part of the core indicators for CPIA assessment. Goal 13 reduces adverse effect on climate increasing control contribution to protecting the environment from global warming through the implementation of the Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Action Framework to be develop from this support.
8.4.Domestic Measurement Reporting and Verification (MRV) on Emission Reduction Project developed and enhanced implementation No existing MRV Framework in Sierra Leone. Pillar 2: Managing natural resources. This supports create effective collaboration in ensuring reduced impact to the environment and sustainable management of natural resources. Through the development of a clear monitoring verification and reporting systems to account for the use of the country natural capital. Positive impact on climate change initiatives that build into the policies and institutions for environmental sustainability which is part of the core indicators for CPIA assessment. Goal 13 reduces adverse effect on climate increasing control contribution to protecting the environment from global warming through the implementation of the monitoring reporting and verification systems.

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